Rugby beekeepers offer an introduction to beekeeping course each year. 

Many of those who have attended have continued their interest and become beekeepers, which is terrific, but not essential. There are those who simply want to know more.

We welcome all comers for whatever their reason.

The course is run over two weekends, generally in February or March and is timed to give those who have taken the course a chance to decide whether or not to start to keep bees and purchase necessary equipment before the season gets underway.

2020's course will be held on 29th February and 7th March 2020.

It is a broad brush approach covering all the main topics in sufficient depth to allow an understanding of what the hobby will entail but it will necessarily leave a lot of reading to the individual to fully understand more than just the basics.

It will cover a little history, necessary equipment, practical information regarding how to take care of the bees, diseases and how we deal with them.

The course is run by several members of Rugby beekeepers, all of whom are available to discuss aspects of the subject, share experiences and enthusiasm.

As part of the course we offer practical support and mentorship to all those who choose to become beekeepers.

We have a branch apiary where hands on experience and confidence can be gained throughout the summer months.

The course also includes lunch, refreshments and honey cakes cooked by our members. In addition, the charge also covers an excellent basic manual, notebook and pen and continued support throughout the year.

Please note that we have limited places. Cut-off for applications is 31/01/2020.

Please click here to register your interest.

Click here to download the 2020 course flyer.


Beebase

Beebase News Web feed
  • Beebase Registrations
    19 August 2019
    Due to an IT problem there may be a delay in processing some Beebase registrations. Apologies for any inconvenience caused.
  • Reported Turkish bee has been identified as a UK native leafcutter bee
    05 August 2019
    DNA barcoding analysis of a suspect sample of Osmia spp. from Turkey has confirmed it to be a native UK species of leafcutter bee, Megachile centuncularis.

    The UK has a diverse variety of native bees and we encourage members of the public to seek identification of bee species through the many groups and societies with a particular interest in entomology such as; The ‘BWARS’ (Bees Wasps and Ants Recording Society) Facebook page, https://www.royensoc.co.uk/identifying-insects or https://www.nhm.ac.uk/take-part/identify-nature.html. Sightings may be recorded with the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; https://www.brc.ac.uk/irecord/enter-casual-record.

    We encourage the reporting of non-native species identified by interest groups or members of the public. Guidance on where to report this information can be found on the GB Non-native Species Secretariat (GB NNSS) website (www.nonnativespecies.org/recording). The Government will then take action in accordance with the GB Invasive Non-native Species Strategy to minimise the risks they pose to our flora and fauna. We encourage everyone who travels abroad to check luggage especially if it has been kept outside during their trip. If you do spot a stowaway upon your return to the UK you should report it with the dates and places you went on holiday, and ideally a photo of the insect via the GB NNSS website.
  • Asian hornet in New Milton, Hampshire
    03 July 2019

    The National Bee Unit has today (Wednesday 3 July 2019) confirmed a sighting of an individual, female Asian hornet in New Milton, Hampshire, after it was reported by a member of the public. Based upon visual examination, the hornet is likely to be a queen.

    Further information can be found here.