I started this little project because we came into possession of an expanded polystyrene box and lid of a suitable size, about 60cm x 35cm x 25cm.

You will require such a box, with a close fitting lid and walls thick enough to allow fittings to be added, in this case about 3cm thick. A wooden box of a similar size would be fine and may be easier to work if you have some basic woodworking skills and tools.

Access to a domestic vacuum cleaner with a hose, I used our ash vacuum, but something like a Henry would be fine.

A length of tube of a similar diameter to the vacuum cleaner tube. I have bought a 2m length of 5cm OD clear plastic tube from a local supplier. This has 2 benefits, the interior diameter is smooth, which I hope, will minimise bee damage and clear, so you can see the bees on their progress down the tube.

The main disadvantage is that the tube I bought is very stiff so is difficult to manhandle. It would be possible to use another vacuum cleaner hose which would be more flexible but will, I'm sure, cause more trauma to the bees.

 Click to EnlargeClick to EnlargeClick to Enlarge 

To connect the tubes to the box I visited a local hardware store with the tube dimensions and sorted through the plastic plumbing fittings until I found something that would suit the size of the tubes and allow me to clamp then through the wall of the box. See Photo 1, 4 and 5

At one end of the box I cut a hole in the middle of the short edge that would take the plumbing fitting and glued it in place. This will be where the bees enter the box.

At the other end of the box I cut a hole on the long edge as close to the box end and base as possible, this is the hole for the vacuum tube fitting to be fixed into. This is where the vacuum cleaner tube is attached to the box to supply the suction. See Photo 2.

From a piece of 4 or 5mm MDF I cut a piece the width of the box interior that would go from the top of the opening to the bottom at an angle of about 45 deg. This should be close fitting and clear the internal part of the plumbing fitting used to attach the suction hose. See Photo 3.

 Click to Enlarge Click to EnlargeIn the middle of the MDF sheet I cut a rectangular hole about half the total area of the sheet. From a local motor factor i.e. Halfords, I bought a sheet of expanded aluminium mesh as used for car body repair and cut a piece about 3 - 4cm larger than the cut out on the MDF sheet and stuck this in place over the cut out. This is to provide a barrier to keep the bees in the box and not get sucked into the vacuum cleaner. See Photo 3.

I attached the MDF sheet into the box using Duct tape to provide a bee proof join. See Photo 3.


BeeBase

Beebase News Web feed
  • Survey on how training and information sources for beekeepers and bee farmers can be improved now closed
    20 April 2021
    With thanks to those of you who have already responded. 

    Gyda diolch i'r rhai ohonoch sydd eisoes wedi ymateb. 

    Defra and the Welsh Government want to ensure that beekeepers and bee farmers have access to training and information that can help them implement effective biosecurity and maintain good standards of husbandry, so as to minimise pest and disease risks and improve the sustainability of honeybee populations.

    A questionnaire was available for current beekeepers, people who have recently stopped keeping bees as well as bee farmers to give their views and opinions on the type, accessibility and range of training and information available and how it could be improved. 

    The survey closed on 21 April
  • Seasonal Bee Inspector (SBI) Vacancies
    19 April 2021
    The National Bee Unit currently has a number of Seasonal Bee Inspector (SBI) vacancies advertised in the following areas South Kent & East Sussex, South West Devon and South East Wales

    If you are interested in applying for the job, full details can be found on Civil Service Jobs.


  • Reporting Varroa
    12 April 2021
    Amendments to the Bee Diseases and Pests Control (England) Order 2006, the Bees Diseases and Pest Control (Scotland) Order 2007 and the Bee Diseases and Pests Control (Wales) Order 2006 come into force on the 21st of April 2021 requiring all beekeepers and/or officials in GB to report the presence of Varroa in any of the hives that they manage. This amendment will allow Great Britain to comply with the Animal Health Law which is necessary for future working relationships with the European Union.

    To make this simple, a tick box will be introduced to BeeBase, the voluntary register for beekeepers managed by the National Bee Unit. This will be the easiest way to report Varroa but an alternative mechanism will be provided for those who do not wish to register on the BeeBase system. Details of this alternative system will be provided after 21st April. If Scottish Beekeepers wish to, they can report varroa by contacting the Scottish Bee Health Inspectors (BeesMailbox@gov.scot).

    Although Varroa is known to be widespread, it continues to be one of the most serious pests faced by beekeepers. Reporting Varroa will contribute to the overall pest and disease surveillance work of the National Bee Unit and the Scottish Bee Health Inspectorate. We are grateful for your assistance with this new simple measure.

    No action will be required until after 21st April.